PDF Format:

CC10122015.pdfCC10122015.pdf

CITY OF SHAWNEE
CITY COUNCIL MEETING
MINUTES
October 12, 2015
7:30 P.M.

Michelle Distler - Mayor

Councilmembers Present Staff Present
Councilmember PflummCity Manager Gonzales
Councilmember NeighborAssistant City Manager Killen
Councilmember JenkinsCity Clerk Powell
Councilmember KemmlingFinance Director Rogers
Councilmember Vaught Development Services Dir. Wesselschmidt
Councilmember MeyerInformation Technology Director Bunting
Councilmember Sandifer Planning Director Chaffee
Councilmember KenigParks and Recreation Director Holman
Police Chief Moser
Deputy Public Works Director Sherfy
Assistant Public Works Director Gard
Communications Manager Ferguson
Management Analyst Schmitz
Business Liaison Holtwick
(Council Committee Meeting Called to Order at 7:30 p.m.)

A. ROLL CALL

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Good evening and welcome to tonight’s meeting of the Shawnee City Council. I would ask that you please silence your electronic devices at this time.

Mayor Distler was unable to attend tonight's meeting. I am Stephanie Meyer, Council President and Councilmember from Ward III, and I will be chairing this meeting. I will do a roll call at this time. Councilmember Neighbor?

COUNCILMEMBER NEIGHBOR: Present.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Councilmember Pflumm?

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: Here.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Councilmember Jenkins?

COUNCILMEMBER JENKINS: Present.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Councilmember Kemmling?

COUNCILMEMBER KEMMLING: Present.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Councilmember Vaught?

COUNCILMEMBER VAUGHT: Present.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Councilmember Sandifer?

COUNCILMEMBER SANDIFER: Present.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: And, Councilmember Kenig?

COUNCILMEMBER KENIG: Present.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Thank you.

B. PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE AND MOMENT OF SILENCE

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Please join us for the Pledge of Allegiance followed by a moment of silence.

(Pledge of Allegiance and Moment of Silence)

C. CONSENT AGENDA

1. APPROVE MINUTES FROM THE CITY COUNCIL MEETING OF SEPTEMBER 28, 2015.
2. REVIEW MINUTES FROM THE PLANNING COMMISSION MEETING OF SEPTEMBER 21, 2015.
3. CONSIDER EXTENSION OF SUP-08-01-09, SPECIAL USE PERMIT PREVIOUSLY ISSUED TO KENTUCKY FRIED CHICKEN/TACO BELL RESTAURANT, TO OPERATE A RESTAURANT IN THE COMMERCIAL NEIGHBORHOOD ZONING DISTRICT, LOCATED AT 5650 HEDGE LANE TERRACE.
4. CONSIDER EXTENSION OF SUP-08-86-07, SPECIAL USE PERMIT PREVIOUSLY ISSUED TO C.E. (BUD) BESCH, TO OPERATE OLYMPIC CAR WASH IN THE COMMERCIAL NEIGHBORHOOD ZONING DISTRICT, LOCATED AT 6401 NIEMAN ROAD.
5. CONSIDER EXTENSION OF SUP-08-10-08, SPECIAL USE PERMIT FOR ABC’S AND 123’S DAYCARE, TO ALLOW A DAYCARE WITH UP TO 12 CHILDREN IN THE PLANNED SINGLE FAMILY ZONING DISTRICT FOR SHILA O'BANNON, LOCATED AT 4705 LONE ELM.
6. CONSIDER EXTENSION OF SUP-09-09-09, SPECIAL USE PERMIT PREVIOUSLY ISSUED TO CASEY'S GENERAL STORE, TO ALLOW A CONVENIENCE STORE WITH GAS PUMPS, LOCATED AT 20810 JOHNSON DRIVE.
7. CONSIDER EXTENSION OF SUP-06-98-09, SPECIAL USE PERMIT PREVIOUSLY ISSUED TO BURDOLSKI AUTO WERKS, TO OPERATE AN AUTO BODY REPAIR SHOP IN THE TOWNSQUARE ZONING DISTRICT, LOCATED AT 11114 WEST 60TH STREET.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: The next item on the agenda is C, the Consent Agenda. Does the Council have any items they would like to remove? Seeing none, I will accept a motion.

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: So moved.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Do I have a second?

COUNCILMEMBER JENKINS: Second.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: All right. A motion has been made and seconded on this item. All those in favor say aye.

COUNCILMEMBERS: Aye.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Opposed nay. The motion passes. (Motion passes 8-0)


D. MAYOR’S ITEMS

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: The next item is D, Mayor’s Items. On behalf of the Mayor, I want to thank the many, many people involved in the dedication of Erfurt Park last weekend. Unfortunately neither the Mayor nor I were in town to attend, but I have heard that the event was well attended and that Councilmember Vaught did a great job. I am sure some of the other Councilmembers who attended will have more detail later in the meeting, but I just wanted to say thank you on behalf of the Mayor. And I did speak with her earlier and she watched the ceremony, so she just wants to thank everyone for being involved and was sorry that she missed it. All right.

E. APPOINTMENTS

1. CONSIDER APPOINTMENT OF SARA SOMSKY TO THE PLANNING COMMISSION.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: The item is E, Appointments. Item 1 is to Consider the Appointment of Sara Somsky to the Planning Commission. Is Sara here this evening? Hi, Sara. Thank you. Mayor Distler is recommending the appointment of Sara Somsky to the Planning Commission to fill the unexpired term of Jim Schnefke with a term ending on June 30, 2017. Is there any discussion from the Council? Is there anyone from the audience who would like to speak to this item? All right.

COUNCILMEMBER VAUGHT: Move for approval.

COUNCILMEMBER NEIGHBOR: Second.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: All right. A motion has been and seconded. All those in favor say aye.

COUNCILMEMBERS: Aye.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Opposed nay. Motion passes. (Motion passes 8-0)

F. BUSINESS FROM THE FLOOR

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: The next item is F, Business from the Floor. Is there anyone who has comments on an issue that is not on tonight’s agenda? Okay. Sir, yeah, if you’ll come on up and state your name and address for the record.

Public Comment:

MR. STOVER: Good evening everyone. My name is Ethan Stover. I live at (Address Omitted). And I thought it was important to come this evening obviously for the issue of the train noise that’s recently come up. I just want to make sure that everyone understands that this is a neighborhood that’s being affected by this noise. Lots of young families, lots of young children. The impact that this noise is making on our neighborhood is making our quality of life very, very challenging. You know, this train is coming -- these trains are coming through at all hours of the day, all hours of the evening. They’re honking horns all of the time. It is very, very challenging to have any sort of consistency of quality of life. You know, myself, I have brand new twins. I have a three-year-old daughter and we are constantly up with these children because of this. Through the day, through the evening, it is just a non-stop issue. What I’m asking is, I know that these types of things cannot be solved overnight. I want to be realistic in my expectations. But my expectations also consist that there is a lot of transparency from this government back to the citizens and the neighbors of this community. I feel like right now we’ve gotten blanket statements. The blanket statements have continued through news reports, through letters that have been mailed out. I’m asking for the board and our Councilmembers’ focus on this issue making this a priority for the families that are affected by this. Thank you very much.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Thank you, sir. And if you’ll sign there on the podium. And I’ll just agree with you. I live nearby that area, too, and I hear the train horns all night. It seems as though they’re just honking consistently through west Shawnee, so if it would be helpful City Manager Gonzales can maybe give an update on where we are if that works. So, I turn it over.

CITY MANAGER GONZALES: Yeah. I don’t probably have more to offer than what’s been said on several newscasts this week, but we are -- it is absolutely a priority and we are very actively working on solutions related to property access and perhaps property acquisition. We’d like to actually close some of those crossings if at all possible. So, it’s absolutely a priority and we are working every day on it.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Is there anyone else from the audience who would like to speak? Okay. Seeing none, we’ll move on.

G. PUBLIC ITEMS

1. CONSIDER A SHAWNEE ENTREPRENEURIAL AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AGREEMENT WITH DEVICESHOP.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: The next item is G, Public Items. Item 1 is to Consider a Shawnee Entrepreneurial and Economic Development Agreement with the DeviceShop. Policy Statement (PS-65), the Economic Development Fund, established the Shawnee Entrepreneurial and Economic Development (SEED) Program. DeviceShop, an entrepreneurial resource and development center for start-ups and expanding companies, has formally requested consideration for assistance through the SEED Program.

The recommended action is to consider approving and authorizing the Mayor to sign the SEED Agreement with the DeviceShop in the amount of $75,000. Is there any discussion from the Council? Councilmember Kemmling.

COUNCILMEMBER KEMMLING: Probably every time one of these SEED grants has come up I’ve made my obligatory statement that I’m not a huge fan of them and I don’t really like the wording in our agreement, so I’ll just second that tonight. I appreciate this company being in Shawnee and wanting to expand and grow. I just don’t think it’s our role as government to give them money.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Anyone else? Councilmember Kenig?

COUNCILMEMBER KENIG: Yeah. I just wanted to make a comment. Consider the DeviceShop to be an asset to our community. For those of you who haven’t had a chance to visit them, they’re very hospitable, would be happy to give you a tour. And they’re very unique in that they are basically an incubator. They provide materials, resources, meeting space for businesses, production facilities as well so businesses can actually do video production within their facility. They provide 3-D printers, equipment. So, what they do is basically facilitate a place for these start-up businesses to get off the ground and kind of launch their products and services. And then hopefully those businesses when they’re ready to expand and find a place of their own will call Shawnee home after that. So, they are pretty unique as far as -- in terms of what they do and the service they provide in the community. So, not just your typical start-up, it’s really kind of the role they play in growing and developing a myriad of start-up businesses. Several who have already moved out and unfortunately have moved to other locations because we don’t have the office space here in the City yet, which I hope will change. But they are a great asset to the community. And if you haven’t had a chance to visit them and tour them, I highly recommend it.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Councilmember Jenkins and then Neighbor.

COUNCILMEMBER JENKINS: Yes. I’d just like to comment that I in principle agree with Councilmember Kemmling about giving money to businesses. But when I look at this particular business it just seems a lot different to me and the fact that it’s very unique in nature and I think it has the opportunity, or it provides an opportunity to grow businesses for Shawnee as sort of a seed in itself, if we’re planting seeds, and therefore, maybe growing some business. So, I can see there might be some connection with bringing something back to the community in terms of long-term gains and moving forward. So, in this particular case I would favor it.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Councilmember Neighbor?

COUNCILMEMBER NEIGHBOR: Yeah. I’d just like to second what Brandon had mentioned there. And the other part is the SEED program was set up and established using the Economic Development Fund, which is where the funding from this comes from. But it is truly, truly, if you have not been through there, I encourage you to take a tour. It is a very unique place, office, the service they provide. Gee whiz, one of the things they had when Brandon and I went through, you know how the camera goes across the stadium and whoops and swoops and things, why they -- they’re developing one of those, one of their people in there. So it’s a place for things to grow and I think it is definitely a benefit to our City, whether all of these people stay here or not. But it will become an attraction for them or others to come and help our City grow and get a reputation for promoting these types of businesses.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Okay. Is there anyone from the audience who would like to speak to this item? All right. Seeing none, I will accept a motion.

COUNCILMEMBER SANDIFER: So moved.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Do I have a second?

COUNCILMEMBER VAUGHT: Second.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: All right. A motion has been made and seconded on this item. All those in favor say aye.

COUNCILMEMBERS PFLUMM, NEIGHBOR, JENKINS, VAUGHT, MEYER, SANDIFER, KENIG: Aye.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Opposed nay.

COUNCILMEMBER KEMMLING: Nay.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: The motion passes with one nay coming from Councilmember Kemmling. (Motion passes 7-1).

2. CONSIDER A RESOLUTION AND APPROVING AND AUTHORIZING THE MAYOR TO SIGN THE DEED AND RELATED DOCUMENTS CONVEYING PROPERTY TO STAG’S RUN, LLC IN CONNECTION WITH FINAL PAYMENT OF INDUSTRIAL REVENUE BONDS.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Item 2 is to Consider a Resolution and Approving and Authorizing the Mayor to Sign the Deed and Related Documents Conveying Property to Stag's Run, LLC in Connection with the Final Payment of Industrial Revenue Bonds.

In 2007, the City issued $1,790,000 of Industrial Revenue Bonds for an office building at 7420/7430 Switzer for Stag's Run, LLC. The Company has notified the City that the bonds will be paid in full, on or about November 9, 2015, and requests to exercise its option to purchase the Project as provided in the Lease Agreement. A resolution is required.

The recommended action is to consider adopting a resolution and approving and authorizing the Mayor to sign the related documents. Is there any discussion from the Council? All right. Is there anyone from the audience who would like to speak to this item? Okay.

COUNCILMEMBER SANDIFER: Move for approval.

COUNCILMEMBER VAUGHT: Second.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: A motion has been made and seconded on this item. All those in favor say aye.

COUNCILMEMBERS: Aye.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Opposed nay. The motion passes. (Motion passes 8-0)

H. ITEMS FROM THE PLANNING COMMISSION MEETING OF SEPTEMBER 21, 2015

1. CONSIDER Z-02-15-09; AN ORDINANCE REZONING FROM COMMERCIAL NEIGHBORHOOD AND SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAL TO SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAL, LOCATED AT 5832 MONROVIA.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: The next item is H, Items from the Planning Commission Meeting of September 21, 2015. Item 1 is to Consider Z-02-15-09; an Ordinance Rezoning from Commercial Neighborhood and Single Family Residential to Single Family Residential, Located at 5832 Monrovia.

On September 21, 2015, the Planning Commission recommended 10-0 that the Governing Body approve Z-02-15-09. The recommended action is to consider passing the ordinance. Is there any discussion from the Council? Is there anyone from the audience who would like to speak to this item? Seeing none, I will accept a motion.

COUNCILMEMBER SANDIFER: Move for approval.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Do I have a second?

COUNCILMEMBER NEIGHBOR: Second.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: A motion has been made and seconded on this item. All those in favor say aye.

COUNCILMEMBERS: Aye.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Opposed nay. The motion passes. (Motion passes 8-0)

I. STAFF ITEMS

1. CONSIDER BUNKER GEAR PURCHASE FOR THE FIRE DEPARTMENT.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: The next item is I, Staff Items. Item 1 is to Consider Bunker Gear Purchase for the Fire Department. The Fire Department has a four-year replacement program for bunker gear. Quotes were obtained from three companies and the staff is recommending purchasing 15 sets from Jerry Ingram Fire & Rescue in the amount of $31,521 in 2015 and an additional 15 sets in 2016 in the amount of $31,521.

The recommended action to consider approving the purchase. Is there any discussion from the Council? Is there anyone from the audience who would like to speak to this item? All right. Seeing none, I will accept a motion.

COUNCILMEMBER SANDIFER: Move for approval.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Do I have a second?

COUNCILMEMBER VAUGHT: Second.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: A motion has been made and seconded on this item. All those in favor say aye.

COUNCILMEMBERS: Aye.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Opposed nay. The motion passes. (Motion passes 8-0)

2. CONSIDER UNIFORM PURCHASE FOR THE POLICE DEPARTMENT.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Item 2 is to Consider Uniform Purchases for the Police Department. The current style of Police uniform has not been updated for many years. A committee was established to review other uniform options that best represent the department. Quotes were received from four vendors and staff is recommending Alamar Uniforms of Lenexa, Kansas in 2015 for $38,281.36, and in 2016 for $38,281.36.

The recommended action is to consider approving the purchase. Is there any discussion from the Council? Councilmember Kemmling?

COUNCILMEMBER KEMMLING: I’ve got a couple questions here. I wanted to make sure that we are not -- we currently replace uniforms as they’re worn out, so this is not maintenance. This is literally for style, changing the look, is that correct?

POLICE CHIEF MOSER: That’s absolutely correct.

COUNCILMEMBER KEMMLING: Okay.

POLICE CHIEF MOSER: Okay. Go ahead.

COUNCILMEMBER KEMMLING: Well, I just wanted to make sure it was for that and not because our uniforms are necessarily old and tattered. The other is I guess a budgetary question. What I’m seeing here is that typically we spend $40,000 a year replacing uniforms and I don’t --

POLICE CHIEF MOSER: That’s correct. When we budgeted for this year to do this project, we anticipated it was going to take more funds because when you get a new uniform, it’s to get everybody enough so that they don’t have to wash them every night. It was going to be a little more to get the project going. And we were very pleased that the quotes came back much less than expected. So, basically we’re spending the same amount of funds as what our replacement [inaudible] each year.

COUNCILMEMBER KEMMLING: Right. Yeah. And that was going to be my comment is that it looked like it’s actually not going to net cost us anything more because we’re getting these new ones for less than we had our maintenance.

POLICE CHIEF MOSER: That’s right.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Okay. Thank you. I think Councilmember Kenig was first and then Councilmember Jenkins.

COUNCILMEMBER KENIG: Yes. I just had a comment. I think this is more Carol. Since this is a pretty big change going from the French blue that, you know, 50-plus years, I think it would be helpful to probably have communications out to the public, letting them know, hey, this change is going to happen, so if you see an officer from a distance it’s not going to be a Lenexa Police officer, it’s not Overland Park, this is Shawnee, we’ve made this change in uniform. But it would be helpful to do kind of like a social media campaign around this I think to make --

CITY MANAGER GONZALES: I know Chief Moser has that already in the works.

COUNCILMEMBER KENIG: Okay. Great.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Okay. Councilmember Jenkins.

COUNCILMEMBER JENKINS: Yeah. I just wanted to come out in favor of this. I think the new uniforms are going to be really sharp. I know we’ve got the new patches and so on. I think it’s not only good for the image of the community, but it’s good for the morale of the policemen themselves. And this is a time when I think anything that could be done to boost the morale of our officers is well warranted.

POLICE CHIEF MOSER: Thank you, sir.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Thank you. Any other discussion from the Council? Is there anyone from the audience who would like to speak to this item? Seeing none, I will accept a motion.

COUNCILMEMBER SANDIFER: Move for approval.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Do I have a second?

COUNCILMEMBER KENIG: Second.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: A motion has been made and seconded on this item. All those in favor say aye.

COUNCILMEMBERS: Aye.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Opposed nay. The motion passes. (Motion passes 8-0)

3. CONSIDER AN INDEPENDENT CONTRACTOR AGREEMENT FOR TECHNOLOGY SERVICES.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Item 3 is to Consider an Independent Contractor Agreement for Technology Services. In 2015, the City's remaining Lotus Notes developer, Susan Bedsaul, resigned to relocate from the area. Ms. Bedsaul has been operating as a contractor since that time. Staff is recommending a continuation of the agreement to provide support as the City migrates away from Lotus Notes.

The recommended action is to consider approving and authorizing the Mayor to sign the agreement with Ms. Bedsaul at a rate of $70 per hour. Is there any discussion from the Council? Councilmember Kemmling. I mean, Kenig. Can you tell I have baseball on the brain tonight? I’m sorry. Go ahead.

COUNCILMEMBER KENIG: Yeah. I just had a question actually for Mel. I noticed that in the background on this it says $70 per hour, but in page 61 of the actual contractual agreement it says 75?

MR. BUNTING: That is correct. Mel Bunting, IT Director. And that is correct. That was my typo. I had 75 on the brain, but 70 on the fingers, so I apologize for that. But it is --

COUNCILMEMBER KENIG: Okay.

COUNCILMEMBER JENKINS: Which one is it?

MR. BUNTING: But it is -- so it’s 75.

COUNCILMEMBER JENKINS: The memo to the City Manager should have said 75?

MR. BUNTING: Yes, correct.

COUNCILMEMBER KENIG: Thank you.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Okay.

COUNCILMEMBER JENKINS: That was my question, so.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Okay. Great. Councilmember Kemmling.

COUNCILMEMBER KEMMLING: So, following up on that, if it is 75, is this estimate of 100,000 a year accurate, or is that based off the 70 number?

MR. BUNTING: Yes. At this point in time it is a correct estimate. It is approximately 27 to 30 hours a week. You know, we’re -- as we transition off of Lotus Notes, you know, I’m going to give kudos to the team. I say the team, the City of Shawnee, the staff. They’re recognizing that, and so our maintenance is changing and the way we provide support. You know, it’s a target. It’s an estimate at this stage of the game, so.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Councilmember Jenkins and then Pflumm.

COUNCILMEMBER JENKINS: Just another question now. You discussed the Lotus program in some of the additional information we have here and mention that we are going to be moving in a direction away from that as that’s kind of an older program and it’s more difficult to find staff and people that are really good at that, dealing with that, and that’s why we’re having to contract out and so on and having trouble finding somebody to come in and fill these positions. What is the estimated time frame on making the transition?

CITY MANAGER GONZALES: I believe we said three to five years in the memo.

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: That’s what it says.

COUNCILMEMBER JENKINS: Three to five.

MR. BUNTING: Yes.

COUNCILMEMBER JENKINS: A hundred thousand bucks a year for three to five years.

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: Well, we’ve been paying it.

COUNCILMEMBER JENKINS: Can we speed that up a little bit, I mean --

CITY MANAGER GONZALES: We have how many applications for Lotus Notes currently used every day by staff?

MR. BUNTING: Two hundred fifty.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Wow.

COUNCILMEMBER JENKINS: Yeah. And?

MR. BUNTING: Yeah. Well --

COUNCILMEMBER JENKINS: Can we speed that up?

MR. BUNTING: The best answer I can give you is it took us 20 years to build it, so it is very much on our initiative and our priority, we’ll say it that way, is to get our applications reset. You know, we --

COUNCILMEMBER JENKINS: Who’s going to be doing it, the person that we’re contracting with?

MR. BUNTING: She is going to be providing just our Lotus Notes support.

COUNCILMEMBER JENKINS: Who is going to be accomplishing the transition?

MR. BUNTING: The application development team that we’ve got on staff.

COUNCILMEMBER JENKINS: So, that’s in-house staff that’s going to be doing that?

MR. BUNTING: Correct. Yeah. I mean, right now where we’re at, fundamentally, you know, what I can say is our service request system that we just moved away off of Lotus Notes, it was a nine-month endeavor. It took a lot of resources and a lot of attention to get to that point in nine months. And, you know, I feel real proud of what the team collectively was to accomplish in that very short time span.

COUNCILMEMBER JENKINS: I guess this leads me to a question, however. If, say we went out and hired a temporary hire, somebody to help us in the transition so we could speed that up dramatically in the transitioning to the Microsoft perhaps there’d even be some savings involved there. And at worst, we would at least be getting into our new system more quickly. Is there any option there? Because I really have concerns paying somebody three to five years $100,000 a year and that’s probably going to go up.

CITY MANAGER GONZALES: And I might just clarify. So, there are multiple applications and so not only does Mel’s team have to work to change those over, but then that impacts every working group that uses those. So, in order to keep our -- doing our regular work and change out software and learn new software, we don’t want to overload anybody at any one time, so we’re trying to phase it out at a reasonable pace. And I also want to be clear that we are replacing those with other applications that have costs. So, as our Lotus Notes contract decreases, there will be additional costs for the programs that will replace those, so we aren’t just eliminating databases because we use them.

MR. BUNTING: So, this is just a real brief timeline, a very high level timeline of some activities that we’re doing. And all this you see is in Lotus Notes. And so if you kind of stop at the top we have our CityWorks initiative that we’re currently undergoing. And we have several asset and fleet components that we want to move off of Lotus Notes into the CityWorks application, which we talked about that in the prior meetings, about the price and all the different types of capabilities that are in this product. And so we’re just on the -- just kind of on the tip of this of what this product can do for us. So, as we kind of transition through here we have the new payroll system, and then very much so we would need to provide support to that. And that application is going to go live here at the beginning of 2016. And so as we transition through this we’ve got another set of applications which is the permitting and license, which is code compliance, the permitting and the business licensing. And again, all this is in Lotus Notes. And you kind of see the timelines of what we have. And they’re very aggressive timelines.

And then we follow down with the main application, which is the SDC replacement, which is the Shawnee Development Center. And that application is again built in Lotus Notes. And it’s basically taking all the construction activities that we do, taking a blank piece of land and building it up into a business. And every business that comes into this city has to go through that SDC process. And so we want to move that off of the Lotus Notes and put it into the CityWorks PLL component. And then we have down here, we talk about the whole -- the application reset and looking into Microsoft products. And we are very actively going after that. And so those are the timelines here.

And last but not least is our web upgrade, which is down there at the bottom. And you see all these things transition out. And this is a very aggressive schedule, but we feel confident we can accomplish that. And back to one of your questions about consulting or hiring contractors to help us do that, very much so. You know, we only have -- kudos to the Royals. But we only have really one chance to get this right. And I call this a foundational implementation of what we’re doing. And so we’ve got to do our homework now to figure out what is the best application infrastructure for replacing our Lotus Notes. Lotus Notes is a very powerful tool. It’s been a very dynamic tool for what we’ve been able to do with the resources that we’ve had. And we want to be very cognizant of that. And if we don’t -- if we miss the mark, then we’re back here asking for more resources and more dollars to help us build out applications because we were not sound in our foundational decisions. And so we’re looking at products that will help us expedite those initiatives. We don’t want to just go out and start rebuilding things just for the sake of rebuilding it. We want to make sure we get the right components, the right tools in our toolbox. And so it’s an important part of where we’re at right now.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Councilmember Pflumm and then Kenig.

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: I’m just a little curious on the maintenance side on the Lotus Notes. You know, I would like to get moved over to a newer platform, you know, and reduce our overhead hopefully a little bit there. The question, I mean, you mentioned 27 to 30 hours a week. I mean, is that what they’ve been working, or --

MR. BUNTING: No, they were full-time.

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: So, they were full-time. You’re just setting up pay, you know, this is what we think. If we need you for 50 hours, we’re going to use you for 50. If we need for you 10, we’re going to use you for 10. Or is that a 27 hours a week kind of deal, period?

MR. BUNTING: What I would say is -- my response would be is the $100,000 mark is pretty accurate of what I anticipate for 2016. And again, that’s just a good estimate. And it’s based upon how we’re transitioning off our applications. As an example, up here we are looking at moving a pretty large piece of our component off of Lotus Notes, which is the HR system. And so we’re optimistic that that’s going to change the support structure that we provide within the Lotus Notes because that’s a heavily -- a component we spend a lot of time maintaining, the HR system.

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: So, I would just like to see us cut that back as much as possible. You know, because if we’re changing or supporting and changing apps because maybe we want to do something a little different maybe we wait a year or two on those things that we want differently.

MR. BUNTING: So, this would be a question for the Governing Body is if we were able to engage this consultant to help us with our transitioning, is this something that would be of interest to the Governing Body, which is to say, hey, we have someone that has eight years of operational knowledge of this city and how it works and how it operates, would it be wise for us as a city, as we reset our applications and now we’re realizing our Lotus Notes support, instead of contracting her dollars, offering her the opportunity to help us reset in our applications.

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: Didn’t quite understand what that -- what you were --

MR. BUNTING: Coming back to Councilmember Jenkins’ response is can we hire more people to get us moving faster.

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: I’m with Mr. Jenkins. I mean, if --

COUNCILMEMBER JENKINS: I was looking in terms of temp hires, city temps perhaps, or consultants. I don’t think it’s really boxed in by any restraints there. It’s just bringing in some staff that would be focused on this particular project for a certain duration and those people could be let go once the transition is made and we can move back to normal staffing patterns, but that was all I had to say. And then I don’t know if that’s even feasible. What City Manager Gonzales said was apparently that’s an issue for each one of the departments as well. So, even though you may have more people in IT, that doesn’t necessarily solve their problems over there because they still got to make the transition and so on. So, that’s got me a little bit clouded. I don’t really know how to put all that together right now just based on the two different sets of comments, so, perhaps you could help me with that even. I mean, the issues then. The various departments of the city, are they a constraint in getting them converted?

CITY MANAGER GONZALES: What I was trying to explain, and obviously not very well, but for example, we’re going to a new HR system, new payroll system. That affects every single employee of the City. We have train every single employee of the City. We have to train every supervisor on the new procedure. And so every time we change an application we -- that affects those departments where those applications are used daily.

COUNCILMEMBER JENKINS: [Inaudible] in terms of the, but not of the application itself, but their implementation of that application.

CITY MANAGER GONZALES: Correct.

COUNCILMEMBER JENKINS: So, you have to train up the staff so that they know how to actually access it, utilize it and work it to the best of --

CITY MANAGER GONZALES: And select it up front. I mean, for example, Maureen’s Finance Department has spent hours, and HR has spent hours in the selection and now the implementation of a huge change of our HR and payroll system. That takes a lot of time of staff just for that department that owns that program let alone the rest of the department. So, for -- and that’s a big application, but we have many, many smaller applications that we all use every day. And so every time one of those changes there is a transition time for departments to adjust.

COUNCILMEMBER JENKINS: I understand that.

CITY MANAGER GONZALES: That’s what I was explaining.

COUNCILMEMBER JENKINS: And that makes perfect sense. However, there may be some cases where this can be run parallel because it doesn’t affect every department, it affects -- payroll, of course, affects everybody. HR is going to affect everybody. But some of these other ones may only affect limited segments of our staffing.

CITY MANAGER GONZALES: Sure.

COUNCILMEMBER JENKINS: And so perhaps if spaced out with a little foresight, maybe several of those can be running concurrently or parallel. So, if we had additional support to move this project forward more quickly, we may still be able to accommodate that and meet those -- the staff train-ups that we need to do and their ability to access and utilize the system and so on. And so I’m thinking that perhaps there is some happy medium here where we can achieve some economies of scale and move this thing forward a little faster because just -- as long as we’re in Lotus Notes we’re not getting anything. We’re paying somebody that’s really just going to go away because the need is not going to be there anymore. So, I’d like to invest in what’s coming more than I am in investing in what’s going I guess is where I’m coming from.

MR. BUNTING: And that was the question that I was asking the Governing Body is if with Susan’s knowledge as we transition off of Lotus Notes, can we or should we look and explore that opportunity of using that eight years of experience to help us transition into the new application?

COUNCILMEMBER JENKINS: I think we’re kind of wrapped around the axle on that one. I mean, we have to to a certain extent. We’ve lost a key staff member that was going to assist in this transition and, therefore, you’re kind of between a rock and a hard place. That’s obvious. And I think we do need to go in that direction. What I’m talking about is phasing her support out as quickly as possible. Moving to the new system, getting it implemented and moving on our way.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Councilmember Pflumm.

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: Yeah. And so what I was going to add to what you commented on there is you obviously have three to $500,000 budgeted over the next three to five years, you know. Your question back to us is are we willing to, you know, move that forward to eliminate that Lotus Notes work. I mean, the less money that we spend on Lotus Notes the better off we are in the future.

COUNCILMEMBER JENKINS: It’s dead money.

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: So, you know, whatever you’ve got to do to figure that out. I mean, that’s obviously a budgeting item, but, you know, I think it would be smart to, you know, front-end some of that to eliminate the Lotus Notes. Basically you’ve got 500,000. You’ve got it spread over five years. I think what Mr. Jenkins was saying was, you know, if we front-end load that maybe we can save some money.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Councilmember Kenig.

COUNCILMEMBER KENIG: Yeah. Just a comment about cost, making sure I understand this correctly. So, this is a one-year contractual term. And since this is based on approximate billable hours, I would think, too, that after a year that you would see that total cost decrease as those applications get moved off. So, we wouldn’t necessarily see 100,000 spent every single year, is that correct? Am I --

MR. BUNTING: Not necessarily.

COUNCILMEMBER JENKINS: I don’t know about that.

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: That was part of my question. And I thought you had said it was a 100,000 because I asked if we only -- if she only works ten hours does she only get paid $750.

COUNCILMEMBER JENKINS: Well, she’s billing hourly.

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: You know, so, is it hourly, or is it a contractual so many hours per year?

MR. BUNTING: It is hourly.

COUNCILMEMBER JENKINS: Hourly up to?

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: So, you could -- is there a minimum number of hours that you can utilize this person for?

COUNCILMEMBER KENIG: And while he’s looking that up, I just want to -- I can attest to the fact that Lotus Notes as a skill set is very difficult to find these days. I think I used it a handful of times back in 2006, and that was the very last time. And so finding anybody to also be able to assist in that and kind of the ramp up, which I understand would be very difficult. It is one of those that there’s just -- it’s not being taught. There’s no training as far as education goes anymore on it. So, anybody that has that skill set is going to be in a very select group and very difficult to find, so.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Councilmember Vaught.

COUNCILMEMBER VAUGHT: I’m just going to go into a little different direction here. I remember I got elected five years ago and I said, can we get rid of Lotus Notes. So, thank you so much for starting this process of getting away from Lotus Notes. How many staff members do we have in IT?

MR. BUNTING: We have 11 counting myself.

COUNCILMEMBER VAUGHT: Okay. So, 11 that you’re maintaining every day, plus you’re going to switch over 250 applications?

MR. BUNTING: That’s correct.

COUNCILMEMBER VAUGHT: All right. And I’m just saying that -- and I agree. I agree with what everybody is saying. I would love to move this as fast as we can, but I’m telling you I have a wife that has a very high level executive position with Ascension Health, because that’s what she does is handles the IT of the purchase and acquisition -- or the acquisition and disposition of hospital systems. And 11 people, I mean, they might be dealing with 20 or 30 applications, they have teams more than that. So, I mean, having 11 people, that’s a tall order. That’s a lot of applications. That’s very entrenched. And plus, you’ve got to remember, these people are still having to work on maintaining what’s here every day. Their sole focus isn’t just I’m going to go to work every day and switch this application. I’m going to go to work every day and maintain what we have and do everything that we have to do at the same time. I’m going to spend X-amount of time, my time migrating to another application. And that’s not a lot of people to do that. So, I agree. I mean, if we’re going to really do it and do it fast you’re going to need more people because 11 people aren’t going to cut it. So, I mean, I think -- I said I agree. I agree with you. So, it’s -- and that’s what we got to look at. I mean, and so maybe we come up with a plan if we want to accelerate that process, then, you know, I guess the question is are we saying, hey, put us together a plan that accelerates that and what’s it going to cost. So, I mean, that’s what I’m hearing. Is that --

COUNCILMEMBER JENKINS: I’d be interested in seeing that. And particularly the standpoint of whether it would actually result in savings. I mean, if it’s going to cost twice as much to do it faster, then I don’t know. Maybe we don’t want to go faster and let it just take its -- let it run its course. But if we -- if there is some benefits to, hey, let’s front-end load this thing a little bit. Let’s get a couple -- some temporaries on board, knock this thing out, get it implemented and move on, well, then that would be something to look at. I don’t know, Mel. I don’t know if you could even come up with some numbers like that, but it would be valuable to know that. I don’t that affects necessarily the item we’re considering on the agenda tonight because I think that’s a done deal for at least the next year anyway. But I’m kind of speaking -- looking outside the box a little bit here on the overall, strategically how -- can we do something else here as we move along and would you be able to with some extra help be able to make this, you know, work more efficiently, come out better in the end. I don’t know.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Councilmember Sandifer.

COUNCILMEMBER SANDIFER: Are there pros and cons on this, of doing it faster or not?

MR. BUNTING: The short answer is yes. I think some of the -- when we talk about bringing in contractors and those types of resources, you know, that skill set and that transference of knowledge then becomes somewhat a challenge to get that into the organization team that will provide that support, so that becomes somewhat of a challenge. But, yes, it can be very much done more expediently provided, you know, you bring in those resources that have those skill sets. You know, really due diligence to make sure you get, you know, talented, capable people that can develop the applications the way you want to try to develop them, that you don’t wind up with kind of an albatross around your neck so to speak.

COUNCILMEMBER SANDIFER: In your opinion, do you think it could be done for less money, or would it be involving similar numbers?

MR. BUNTING: To be honest, right now it’s a little bit ahead of the game. What I would say is that we’ve been transitioning for the past seven months, eight months, you know, posting new positions, getting new talent and new skills on board. I call it you kind of get the hand that you’re dealt. And so, you know, we’re working with the resources and what we’ve got on board now. And we’re now looking at what is the best foundation that we want to build out our applications in. You know, there is VB, VB-Plus, there’s C#, F#. You know, we could go all through the alphabet with the different type of programming languages that are out there. And what we’re focusing on right now is the Microsoft components. We feel like that is the right direction, the right foundation. And so we’re looking at what are those foundational application infrastructures, those tools that we need. And we’re basically in the throes of that. You know, one of the things that we want to be, which is good stewards of our resources is we will need to be looking at an RFQ process and flushing out different vendors that can do those kinds of things. And so if we want to kind of cast that aside, which I don’t -- wouldn’t recommend, then we just go out and we grab those vendors that can help us move along. But I think, you know, an RFQ process is going to take 60 to 90 days and that’s fast. That’s a fast track. I think more realistically it’s going to take four to six months to go through an RFQ process because there’s a lot of things you have to flush out of this when you talk about references and skill sets and who those players are and how many responses we’re going to get. So, yeah, it’s going to be a process that we just got to stay with it.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Councilmember Kemmling.

COUNCILMEMBER KEMMLING: Just a clarification. You had that timeline up. Was that the totality of the conversion or is that just the parts you’ve planned to convert? Is that all the programs, all the applications?

MR. BUNTING: So, what we’ve done is we’ve got basically two classifications of applications. We call them enterprise applications, which really span across the whole organization. And then we have applications which I call desktop or department-based applications, which are focused to a department or a particular area, or group, a team if you will. What you have here is just the enterprise applications that we’re tackling right now. Some of it, as you know, has been an initiative outside other departments. You know, I’m not -- I don’t mean to put Police in the mix, but one of the big applications we have here is their RMS, Records Management System for Police. And that application, we’re having those conversations regionally, internally with where we want to go with the RMS system. And so that in itself will be another big application. We’re going to have to kind of pause all of this and help with the migration of the RMS system. So, it’s really -- we’re trying to go after what I call the enterprise applications. Those are kind of the hot, the most liability. We’re trying to reduce our liability to the organization by getting those enterprise applications off of Lotus Notes and getting them into a better position. So, we reduce organizationally the liability to our organization for those applications. So, then we would then go after what would be some of the department applications.

COUNCILMEMBER KEMMLING: Okay. So, you plan on having the enterprise applications done around the end of 2017 and then getting the desktop ones after that?

MR. BUNTING: Well, there are more enterprise applications that we’ve got to tackle.

COUNCILMEMBER KEMMLING: Oh, okay. So, this isn’t the totality of the enterprise applications?

MR. BUNTING: It’s an example.

COUNCILMEMBER KEMMLING: Okay.

MR. BUNTING: Because there’s more than that.

COUNCILMEMBER KEMMLING: Okay.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Councilmember Pflumm.

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: Yeah. Before we vote could we get an answer on the, you know, is that a minimum -- what is the minimum and what is the maximum?

MR. BUNTING: Yeah. There’s no hours of minimum per week or per year. What it is is it’s a budget number right now of $100,000 for 2016.

COUNCILMEMBER JENKINS: It’s a budget estimate. It’s an estimate cost.

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: So, question. So, what’s the procedure if you go over?

MR. BUNTING: If I say -- we say 100,000, then we go to 101 or 105, 110, 120?

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: Just 101.1.

CITY MANAGER GONZALES: We’d be managing that contract weekly, monthly, keep tabs on it. And if we get towards the end of the year and it’s looking like it’s more than the hundred, we’d probably pull back on some of those applications and say we’re going to wait till next year. So, we would not let it go over unless there is something just absolutely critical that needs to be done.

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: Okay. All right.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Okay. Is there any other discussion from the Council? Thank you. Is there anyone from the audience who would like to speak to this item? Seeing none, I will accept a motion.

COUNCILMEMBER VAUGHT: Move for approval.

COUNCILMEMBER SANDIFER: Second.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: I have a motion and a second on this item. All those in favor say aye.

COUNCILMEMBERS: Aye.
COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Opposed nay. The motion passes. (Motion passes 8-0)

4. CONSIDER CLOSING CITY OFFICES AT NOON ON DECEMBER 24, 2015.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Item 4 is to Consider Closing City Offices at Noon on December 24, 2015. In the past, the Governing Body has approved closing City facilities on Christmas Eve and allowing the employees the option to take a vacation day or a day off without pay. In 2015, Christmas Eve falls on Thursday and the official City holiday will be Friday, December 25th.

The recommended action is to consider closing City facilities at noon on Thursday, December 24th. Is there any discussion from the Council? Anyone from the audience who would like to speak to this item? Seeing none, I will accept a motion.

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: So moved.

COUNCILMEMBER NEIGHBOR: Second.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: A motion has been made and seconded on this item. All those in favor say aye.

COUNCILMEMBERS: Aye.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Opposed nay. The motion passes. (Motion passes 8-0)

J. MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS

1. RATIFY SEMI-MONTHLY CLAIM FOR OCTOBER 12, 2015 IN THE AMOUNT OF $1,790,531.62.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: The next is J, Miscellaneous Items. Item 1 is to Ratify the Semi-Monthly Claim for October 12, 2015, in the amount of $1,790,531.62. Is there any discussion from the Council? Anyone from the audience who would like to speak to this item? Seeing none, I will accept a motion.

COUNCILMEMBER VAUGHT: Move for approval.

COUNCILMEMBER NEIGHBOR: Second.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: A motion and second has been made on this item. All those in favor say aye.

COUNCILMEMBERS: Aye.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Oppose nay. The motion passes. (Motion passes 8-0)

2. MISCELLANEOUS COUNCIL ITEMS.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Item 2 is Miscellaneous Council Items. I see Councilmember Vaught has an item. Go ahead.

COUNCILMEMBER VAUGHT: No. I just wanted to -- the park dedication was wonderful. The German delegation I think appeared to be very impressed. In fact, having conversations with them, they really enjoyed themselves. It’s a beautiful park. If you haven’t been out there yet it’s definitely -- I’d take the drive out 71st Street. It is definitely a premier park in Shawnee right now I think. It’s going to be -- in a couple years when everything grows then that park is going to be incredible. But it was a good time and they had a good time and it was an honor to be able to represent the City and stand in for the Mayor on the dedication and I really appreciate her having the confidence in me to do that. So, it was a good time. And it was -- it turned out really well.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Did you speak German?

COUNCILMEMBER NEIGHBOR: Yes, he did.

COUNCILMEMBER VAUGHT: Guten Morgen and Guten Tag. Good morning and good day. That’s the extent of it right there.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: That’s nice. That’s good. Councilmember Neighbor.

COUNCILMEMBER NEIGHBOR: Yeah. I’d just like to second what Jeff said. I know that a lot of us were out there at the dedication. The flowers out there are really gorgeous at this time. But the other thing is though that I think a couple personalities need to be recognized. First of all, Mr. Holman and all his group, fantastic job. It is really rewarding to see a plan come together and be supported like that. And I second what Jeff said. If you haven’t been out there, you need to go and look at it. It is very, very popular. I think there were more citizens out there wandering around taking advantage of the park than there were people at the dedication. But more important, some people to be recognized would be the Sister Cities Committee. And that’s Dennis Busby, Jim Allen, Joanne Moore, Patty Meyers, Kevin Fern, Alan Willoughby, J.J. Miller and Jeff Meyers. They worked very, very hard to make sure this all worked and they have. But the most important people to thank for all of this is every one of you that go out and buy lots of those little yellow ducks for the little yellow duck race because that’s what pretty much finances this. So, visit the park.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Councilmember Kenig.

COUNCILMEMBER KENIG: Yes. I just want to echo what Jim said and also props to Neil and his whole staff for all of the work done in the final closing days. It was like night and day just being there a couple days before and just seeing all the progress that had been made. And it truly is a unique attraction because it’s unlike any other park I would say within the metropolitan area. And just the amount of detail, amount of work that went into that project to replicate what you would find at our sister city within their parks and the type of architecture and the type of landscaping. I could not stop taking photos when I was out there. So, amazing job. And then also just the entire activities throughout the weekend were flawless. And so it was really great to see those visitors being hosted and also to get a very deep sense of how strong those bonds are between the two cities and just the history, which I had not been exposed to before. So, just really, really awesome experience.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Councilmember Jenkins.

COUNCILMEMBER JENKINS: Yes. I would ditto everything that’s been said. I would just like to add one last piece and that would be Chief Mattox and his folks, that special relationship that our fire department has built with their fire department is rather exception and I think that’s kind of a special part of this whole thing, too, aside from the parks, that was very special. So, kudos to you and your guys, John, appreciate it.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Councilmember Pflumm.

COUNCILMEMBER PFLUMM: Sorry I wasn’t available for that event. But I do have another item if everybody is done with the Erfurt Park dedication. Some complaints from citizens. I would just like staff -- this is probably a Mark Sherfy question here. The Roberts roundabout has two lanes that go east-west and then one lane on the north-south that exits. If you could look into the signage, or if we can put things on the ground, and I’m not saying it’s already the best you can get it, but if we could look into that I would greatly appreciate it. That was brought up a few months back and then again, you know, here just recently. So, anyway, if you could look into that I’d greatly appreciate it.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Is there anyone else who has an item? All right. Seeing none, we will move on to Item 3, which is to conduct an Executive Session for the purpose of discussing land acquisition.

3. CONDUCT EXECUTIVE SESSION FOR THE PURPOSE OF DISCUSSING LAND ACQUISITION.

a) Recess to Executive Session for 20 minutes for the purpose of discussing land acquisition.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: I will accept a motion to recess into Executive Session for 20 minutes to discuss land acquisition.

COUNCILMEMBER VAUGHT: Move to recess into Executive Session for 20 minutes.

COUNCILMEMBER JENKINS: Second.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: A motion has been made and seconded on this item. All those in favor say aye.

COUNCILMEMBERS: Aye.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Opposed nay. Okay. The motion passes. (Motion passes 8-0)

(City Council Meeting in Recess from 8:17 p.m. to 8:45 p.m.)

b) Conclude Executive Session.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: All right. Welcome back. The next action is to conclude the Executive Session. Do I –

COUNCILMEMBER VAUGHT: I move to conclude Executive Session.

COUNCILMEMBER SANDIFER: Second.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: A motion has been made and seconded on this item. All those in favor say aye.

COUNCILMEMBERS: Aye.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Opposed nay. The motion passes. (Motion passes 8-0)

c) Reconvene Meeting.

COUNCILMEMBER VAUGHT: Move to reconvene the meeting.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Do I have a second?

COUNCILMEMBER JENKINS: Second.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: A motion has been made and seconded on this item. All those in favor say aye.

COUNCILMEMBERS: Aye.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Opposed nay. Motion passes. (Motion passes 8-0)

K. ADJOURNMENT

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Okay. If there are no other items this evening, I will accept a motion to –

COUNCILMEMBER SANDIFER: Motion to adjourn.

COUNCILMEMBER VAUGHT: Second.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: A motion has been made and seconded to adjourn. All those in favor say aye.

COUNCILMEMBERS: Aye.

COUNCILMEMBER MEYER: Opposed nay. Motion passes. (Motion passes 8-0). We are adjourned.
(Shawnee City Council Meeting Adjourned at 8:46 p.m.)


CERTIFICATE

I certify that the foregoing is a correct transcript from the electronic sound recording of the proceedings in the above-entitled matter.

/das October 20, 2015

Deborah A. Sweeney, Recording Secretary

APPROVED BY:

_______________________

Stephen Powell, City Clerk











File Attachment Icon
CC10122015.docx